AHS Course Descriptions

             

Business Education

Computer Science

English Language Arts

Family and Consumer Science

Industrial Technology

Mathematics

Music

Physical Education and Health 

Science

Social Studies

Visual Arts

World Language

Programs/Electives/Miscellaneous

Careerline Tech Center

Online Courses

 

 Business Education

Business education prepares the students of Allendale for entry and advancement in business occupations. The curriculum is designed to help students learn how to earn a living and to live wisely in a free enterprise system. Allendale business students need exposure to not only the knowledge and techniques needed within each area but also must build social and human relation skills to experience success on the job.

Accounting - The Cycle (Grades 9-12)

In this introductory, one-semester course, the student will be introduced to the following topics: the accounting cycle, common business transactions, generally accepted accounting principles, and financial documents.  The student will apply the concepts learned in class by analyzing sample business situations and then by constructing the proper accounting documents.  This course will encompass the basic accounting procedures and documents that must be accomplished and produced within 365 days of business operations.  This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University if accompanied with Accounting - The Concepts.

Accounting - The Concepts (Grades 9-12) 

In this introductory, one-semester course, the student will learn some of the common calculations accountants must perform to create the necessary documents for internal and external entities.  The topics of discussion include but are not limited to the following: business checking accounts, cash control systems, payroll, depreciation, inventory, financial analysis of business structures, and uncollectible accounts.  The student will apply what is learned in class by creating business documents derived from simulated business situations and data.  This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University if accompanied with Accounting - The Cycle.

Introduction to Business (Grades 9-12)

In this introductory, one-semester course, the student will be introduced to the essential foundational areas of business. The focus topics are as follows: the economy, social and ethical responsibility, banking, stocks, common business documents, common business software, and business law. The students will apply what is learned throughout the course by completing stimulating assignments, activities, and projects. This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University. 

Entrepreneurship (Grades 9-12)

In this introductory, one-semester course, the student will be introduced to basic legal requirements and focus on a proven methodology that will increase the likelihood of starting and operating a successful business. The student will apply what is learned in the class using an approved fictional business of their choice.  This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University.

Marketing (Grades 9-12)

In this introductory, one-semester course, the student will learn the basic marketing concepts that will give them the strong foundation needed to continue education in this field of study. Topics of discussion are as follows: marketing principles, consumer markets, communication skills, interpersonal skills, international trade, and management structures. This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University

Advertising (Grades 9-12)

In this introductory, one-semester course, the student will learn the basics of personal selling and will use this knowledge as a blueprint to create effective advertisements. In this course, the focus will be on using the marketing concept in sales, which stresses the importance of high levels of customer satisfaction before, during, and long after the purchase. Reinforcement of material discussed in class will be achieved by the students completing stimulating assignments, activities, and projects. This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University.

Personal Finance - Building Wealth (Grades 9-12)

Personal finance with a focus on building wealth is a one-semester course. The programs used, Take Charge of Your Finances and Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance, prepare students for successful management of their own personal finances. It is a course that addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with the management of family economics and financial education. The courses will prepare students for many of the financial decisions they will make after high school.   The topics discussed but not limited to are as follows: values, needs vs. wants, relating with money, setting financial goals, the life cycle of financial planning, career interest and research, investment in yourself, comparing job offers, understanding your paycheck and taxes, depository institutions, checking accounts, debit cards, electronic banking, online banking, spending plans/budgeting, and comparison/bargain shopping. This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University. This semester course meets the graduation requirements for a fourth math credit. 

Personal Finance - Financial Management (Grades 9-12)

Personal finance with a focus on financial management is a one-semester course. The programs used, Take Charge of Your Finances and Dave Ramsey's Foundations in Personal Finance, prepare students for successful management of their personal finances.  It is a course that addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with the management of family economics and financial education.  The courses will prepare students for many of the financial decisions they will make after high school.  The topics discussed but not limited to are as follows: savings, investing, the stock market, time value of money, measuring investments, wealth building, understanding credit cards, understanding credit reports, dangers of debt, types of insurance, renting vs. owning a home, housing, transportation, researching an automobile, consumer decisions/awareness, automobile insurance, automobile loans, and identity theft.  This course has an articulation agreement with Davenport University. This semester course meets the graduation requirements for a fourth math credit. 

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 Computer Science

Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science Principles (Grades 9-12)

AP Computer Science Principles is a two-semester course that offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles allows students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem-solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science.  

Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra 1

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 English Language Arts

The primary goal of the language arts department is to equip every student with the communication skills necessary for success in today’s world. We provide differentiated instruction to meet varying students' needs, including creative, remedial, and advanced courses designed to widen students' scope of discovery, effective communication, and creative expression.   

English 9 (Grade 9)

English 9 is a two-semester course required of all freshmen. It exposes students to literature from around the world to help them understand the diversity of a global society. The course helps students utilize critical thinking skills and effectively communicate through writing, speaking, listening, and reading. Students are taught the basic principles of writing including grammar, style, vocabulary, and form.

English 10 (Grade 10)

English 10 is a two-semester literature-based course required of all sophomores. The class is designed to expose students to real-world issues, including social injustice, and to help them understand that many of the themes in the literature selections taught are timeless, and therefore, still relevant today.   Writing and reading are emphasized and practiced by utilizing critical thinking skills. Personal, descriptive, narrative and expository writing are taught and practiced. Students are also required to complete a research paper.

Prerequisite:  successful completion of English 9

English 11 (Grade 11)

English 11 is a two-semester course for juniors. The class focuses on a historical survey of American literature and on the continued development of grammar, writing, reading, listening, and representing skills as prescribed in the Common Core State Standards and required on standardized tests.

Prerequisites: successful completion of English 9 and English 10 

English 12 (Grade 12)

English 12 is a two-semester course that includes a survey of world literature.  The intent of the course is to review and refine the senior student’s abilities to communicate, express, comprehend, create, and evaluate. The course serves to prepare the college-bound student as well as the student who will enter the work world after graduation. Students will study classical and contemporary literary works, both fiction and nonfiction.  Writing skills are reviewed and refined, and an extensive research project is required for graduation.

Prerequisites: successful completion of English 9, English 10, and English 11     

Advanced Placement (AP) English - Language and Composition (Grade 11 recommended)

AP Language and Composition is a two-semester, college-level course focusing on research, writing, nonfiction reading, and rhetoric (including logic and argument). Students who choose the option of AP English their junior or senior year should be prepared for the additional work this advanced course entails. At the end of the year, students could earn up to six semester credits of college English credit (to be determined by their score on the AP exam and the credit granting policy of the college or university).

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 9 and English 10

Advanced Placement (AP) English - Literature and Composition (Grade 12 recommended)

AP Literature and Composition is a two-semester, college-level course focusing on fiction: short stories, poetry, drama, and full-length novels make up a majority of the assigned texts for the course. Students practice advanced literary analysis using critical theory, College Board resources, and extensive writing and discussion. Students who choose the option of AP English their junior or senior year should be prepared for the additional work this advanced course entails. At the end of the year, students could earn up to six semester credits of college English credit (to be determined by their score on the AP exam and the credit granting policy of the college or university).

Prerequisites: successful completion of English 9 and English 10

Yearbook (Grades 10-12)

Yearbook is a one-semester elective course offered during the second semester only. The purpose of Yearbook is to compile and publish the Allendale High School yearbook. Students learn to design, organize, and complete the yearbook while meeting deadlines. Students conduct a sales campaign to market the book and sell advertising space to local businesses.

Suggested Prerequisite: participation in the fall yearbook club campaign (meets after school)

Creative Writing (Grades 9-12)

Creative Writing is a one-semester elective course in which students will examine and demonstrate the elements of creative writing as evident in various genres, including poetry, short story, creative nonfiction, and more.

Applied English (Grades 9-12)

Applied English is a one-semester elective course offered during the first semester only. The class provides opportunities for the true application of English skills designed to help students develop effective communication to express their ideas through public speaking, social media, and digital communication formats. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, and interpersonal skills necessary to be effective communicators in academic, workplace, and community settings. In addition to presenting several types of public speeches, students will also explore and practice other communication formats including interviewing, digital media, group discussion, and communication analysis. Students will learn about the role of communication in our lives, the communication model, delivery styles, and the effectiveness of language, gestures, and organization techniques.

Experiencing the Classics (Grades 10-12)

Experiencing the Classics is a one-semester elective course in which students read, view, discuss, critique, and write about classic works of literature (primarily novels and plays) that are vital to developing their cultural literacy and readiness for college and life.  Works studied in this class include Hamlet, Pride and Prejudice, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, and additional works students may choose themselves. Optional field trips allow students to explore the traits of "a classic" in not only literature, but also in dramatic, musical, and visual arts as well.

 Young Adult Literature (Grades 9-12)

Young Adult Literature is a one-semester elective course in which students will read, discuss, and write about contemporary young adult literature. Through literature, students will explore topics, issues, and themes that are relevant to today's teens. This class will help students strengthen reading comprehension and writing skills, develop good reading habits, and increase their reading quality, quantity, and enjoyment.

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 Family and Consumer Science

 The ultimate objective of Family and Consumer education is to help students learn and incorporate the necessary skills to have productive, complete, and knowledgeable lives. Family and Consumer Science education prepares students to evaluate, coordinate, and function in multiple adult roles of day-to-day living and working throughout the life cycle.  Students need to gain experience in making decisions about many of the issues that will affect them as consumers including housing, nutrition, childcare, and major purchases.  The classes within the Family and Consumer Science department will help each student develop skills that will prove valuable in understanding self, family, friends, and dating partners.

 Personal Living (Grades 9-12)

The goal of Personal Living is to provide students with the knowledge needed to make good decisions and provide skills that are necessary to live a successful and productive personal life. This class is a one-semester exploratory class in which many aspects will be covered. Some of the topics which will be emphasized throughout the semester include understanding teen challenges, building and maintaining a healthy self-concept, understanding yourself, decision making, personal values, goals, and skills for problem-solving, communication, managing stress, and conflict management. Students will gain skills for getting a job, interviewing, employability skills, and creating a budget based on income, needs, and wants.  Furthermore, students will plan for their future goals by researching potential careers and colleges, learning how to live with roommates, renting and furnishing a first dorm/apartment, and planning healthy meals.

**This course cannot be repeated in the same school year.

Child Development and Parenting Skills (Grades 9-12)

Child Development and Parenting Skills is a one-semester class designed to give students an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills about the impact of unplanned pregnancy, effective parenting skills, pregnancy and prenatal development, and infant development.  Reproductive health will be explored as students will learn about how to have a healthy pregnancy, the stages of prenatal development beginning with conception, and birth defects such as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.  This course will also provide students with the knowledge and skills to become effective parents and mentors for children whenever they assume the responsibilities of these roles in life.  The social, emotional, financial, and educational challenges of unplanned pregnancy and parenting will be explored.  Although not mandatory, students will be given the opportunity to be a “parent” to an infant simulator and wear a “pregnancy suit”. Students will learn about infant development (Physical, Intellectual, Emotional, Social), infant needs, and how to care for an infant.  Students will also learn about Shaken Baby Syndrome and ways to cope with crying.  Different child activities are explored to examine the benefits for development.

**This course cannot be repeated in the same school year.

Food and Nutrition (Grades 9-12)

Food and Nutrition is a one-semester class that will allow students to learn the basics of food preparation as well as planning healthy and nutritious meals. The course will emphasize food preparation techniques, safety concerns, food selection, and menu planning, basic nutrition, and evaluation of fast food/restaurant nutrition.  Consumer awareness in making healthy food choices will be accentuated throughout this semester course.  Students will also learn basic table manners and etiquette.  Students will also gain teamwork and cooperation skills while developing food preparation skills.  After completing this class, students should be able to prepare meals for themselves and their families, as well as obtain a job in a restaurant as a server or cook. This semester course meets the graduation requirements for an elective credit, visual performing applied arts credit or a fourth math credit. 

**This course cannot be repeated in the same school year.

Family and Relationships (Grades 9-12)

Family and Relationships is a one-semester course.  In this course, students will assess interpersonal relationships within family, friends, and dating partners. Students will gain an understanding and awareness of self, their own families, various family dynamics, and clarify personal values.  The course will thoroughly cover a unit on dating which includes: boundaries and expectations, maturity, communication skills, stages of a relationship, healthy vs. unhealthy relationships, choosing a compatible partner, making relationships work, building trust, recognizing “red flags”, anger and jealousy, love vs. infatuation, abuse, addictive love, ending relationships respectfully, steps to recovery, and laws related to intimate relationships.  The myths and facts of marriage will be explored, along with components of successful marriages, planning a wedding, preparation, and readiness for marriage, expectations, and adjustments.  Students will also learn healthy conflict resolution techniques. Furthermore, through a unit on diversity, students will learn about families from other cultures and groups as well as various relationship constructs including but not limited to ethnic, racial, and religious minority groups, heterosexual, LGBTQ+, inter-racial, etc. This unit will increase cultural awareness and break down misconceptions and stereotypes.  After completing this course, students will have a better understanding of themselves and an acceptance of individuals who differ from them.  In addition, students will be equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge that is necessary to have healthy and successful family relationships, friendships, and dating relationships.

**This course cannot be repeated in the same school year.

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 Industrial Technology 

 To be competitive in today’s society and the workplace an individual must be able to communicate, work collaboratively, solve problems, and think critically. The goal of industrial technology education is to teach students to use technology as a tool in developing solutions to problems. Exposing students to a variety of fields in which technology is used and they will develop lifelong skills that may lead to employment or post-secondary career fields. Students will have the option to receive a semester credit for the following: Elective, Visual Performing Applied Arts (VPAA), Math. Talk with your counselor about the best option that fulfills your graduation requirements. 

Introduction to Woodworking Technology (Grades 9-12)

Introduction to Woodworking Technology is an introductory, one-semester course intended for students who enjoy hands-on activities. The class will introduce students to the basic concepts and fundamentals of woodworking. Instruction and demonstration covering power tools, woodworking equipment, hardware, woodworking terminology, and a strong emphasis on safety will be covered. Students will start out with basic projects that provide them with an understanding of design, creating sets of working prints, and print reading. Examples of projects would include; a desktop clock, cutting boards, side tables, and end tables, etc… As your skills and confidence increase, you will advance to more challenging projects. Instruction stresses the development of knowledge and skills needed for product design, production, recognizing appropriate safety and workmanship standards. Students will use a variety of woodworking machines, tools, and materials. This is a STEM-based class that emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision-making, and time management skills. This semester course meets the graduation requirements for an elective credit, visual performing applied arts credit or a fourth math credit. 

Woodworking Technology II (Grades 9-12)       

Woodworking Technology II is a one-semester course that will help today's students understand the ways in which the world is built and designed. Students will learn various advanced woodworking techniques of manufacturing and mass production, furniture design, and cabinetry.  Students will have an opportunity to work on personal projects. Instruction stresses the development of knowledge and skills needed for product design, production, recognizing appropriate safety and workmanship standards. Students will use a variety of woodworking machines, tools, and materials. This course is intended for those who have any interest in the areas of architecture, manufacturing, design, or engineering. This is a STEM-based class that emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision-making, and time management skills. This semester course meets the graduation requirement for an elective credit, visual performing applied arts credit or a fourth math credit. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Woodworking Technology

Woodworking Technology III (Grades 10-12)                                                  

Woodworking Technology III is a one-semester course that will help today's students understand the ways in which the world is built and designed. This course offers our advanced woodworking students the opportunity to learn techniques of cabinetry and furniture design. Students will apply the concepts and fundamentals retained from their previous woodworking classes to build a project of their choosing based on various woodworking and engineering industry standards. Other techniques may include panel doors, drawers, trim work, hardware, pre-finishing, finishing, and advanced router millwork. Students will use different woodworking machines, tools, and materials. This course is intended for those who have any interest in the areas of architecture, manufacturing, finish carpentry, interior design, or engineering. This is a STEM-based class that emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision-making, and time management skills. This semester course meets the graduation requirement for an elective credit, visual performing applied arts credit or a fourth math credit. 

Prerequisite: Woodworking Technology II

Introduction to Drafting and Engineering (Grades 10-12)

Introduction to Drafting and Engineering is an introductory, one-semester course that will help today's students understand the ways in which the world is built and designed. Drafting boards and computers will be used to expose students to the design and engineering process. Drafting and engineering industrial standards will be covered. These standards will provide the student with an understanding of concepts and fundamentals that are used in the drafting and engineering industry. Students will have an understanding of how an idea is produced on the drafting board, refined using computer-aided software, and prepared for production. This course is intended for students that have an interest in the areas of manufacturing, architecture, design, or engineering. This is a STEM-based class that emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision-making, and time management skills. This semester course meets the graduation requirement for an elective credit, visual performing applied arts credit, computers, or a fourth math credit. 

Home Improvement (Grades 10-12)

Home Improvement is a one-semester course that helps students learn various home repair techniques. The class will focus on residential construction techniques, proper hand and power tool use, layout, blueprint reading, and safety awareness skills. Industry standards with a focus on the Michigan building code will be covered. Students will spend the majority of the course working in groups on various construction and home repair projects. The course will teach the basics of print reading, framing, roofing framing, electrical wiring, drywall, industry terminology, and math concepts. This course is intended for those who have any interest in the areas of architecture, residential contractor, rough carpentry, interior design, or engineering. This is a STEM-based class that emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision-making, and time management skills. This semester course meets the graduation requirement for an elective credit, visual performing applied arts credit or a fourth math credit. 

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 Mathematics

The building blocks of primary and secondary mathematics are important not only to our children but also to the future of our communities. Mathematical knowledge is essential for students’ educational development and future employment. An effective mathematics curriculum prepares students to learn to think, reason, solve problems and apply mathematics in everyday situations. To achieve these goals, we use a program developed by Big Ideas Math which incorporates both books and online internet support.

Algebra 1 (Grades 9-12)

Algebra 1 is a two-semester course in which students are introduced to basic algebra concepts. These concepts include an understanding of our number system, solving and graphing equations and inequalities, identifying and using families of functions, solving systems of equations, and computing with exponents.

Algebra 2 (Grades 9-12)

Algebra 2 is a two-semester course that expands upon the topics and principles taught in Algebra 1. Course topics include linear functions, modeling with and solving quadratic functions in both the real and complex number systems, polynomial functions, rational and radical functions, exponential functions, and rational functions.  In each, the emphasis is placed on applying mathematical concepts to solve real-world problems. 

Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra 1

Geometry (Grades 10-12) 

Geometry emphasizes the application of mathematics to our physical world. It is a two-semester course. Coordinates, transformations, measurement formulas, and three-dimensional figures are studied. Deductive and inductive reasoning, computing distance and measuring angles, and the properties of geometric figures are covered. Special attention is given to utilizing those concepts developed previously. Instruction in calculator use and computers is integrated into the course content. 

Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra 1 and Algebra 2

College Algebra (Grades 11-12)

College Algebra is a one-semester course that is designed to cover the algebraic concepts students are likely to encounter in their first-year college algebra class. It is intended for those students who want the opportunity to earn college credit for their first-year math requirement while satisfying one credit of their high school graduation requirement in math. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to Algebraic Operations, Equations and Inequalities, Functions and their Properties, and Number Systems and Operations. At the conclusion of the class, students will have the opportunity to take the CLEP exam. How they perform on this exam will determine whether or not they can earn credit towards their college math requirement.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry

Pre-Calculus (Grades 11-12)

Pre-Calculus is a two-semester course designed to review and bring together what has been learned in previous math courses as well as prepare students for the study of calculus. Its subject matter includes the function families, logarithms, trigonometry, extending skills at solving equations, and basic ideas regarding limits. Students will develop higher-order problem-solving skills using tables, graphs, equations, and words.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry

**Precalculus can be taken concurrently with Geometry with counselor approval.

Introduction to Statistics (Grades 10-12)

In this one-semester course, students will be introduced to the major concepts of probability, interpretation of data, and statistical problem-solving. Students will learn the course concepts through hands-on experimentation and investigation. They will analyze existing data as well as data collected through a survey, observational study or experiment. They will then display the data in different ways, analyze it, and draw conclusions based on the results. The four main components of the course are: exploring data, data collection, probability, and inference.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra 1 and Algebra 2 

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus (Grade 12)

This is a two-semester course for the math student that is looking to go above and beyond to possibly earn college credit through the Advanced Placement testing program. The course includes a study of limits, derivatives, and their applications, and integrals and their applications. Students can then sit for the AP Calculus AB test to potentially earn college credit in May.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Pre-Calculus; instructor/counselor approval

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 Music

Concert Band (Grades 9-12)

Concert Band is a one-semester course designed to advance student technique in the areas of rhythm, tone, ensemble performance, musical style, and musical knowledge. Students will use a variety of material provided by the teacher. During First Semester this course is offered as an alternative to Marching Band for those who wish to focus on Concert Music. In the second semester, members of the marching band will join this ensemble.  Students in this class should have previously mastered the basics of the areas listed above. Participation in a variety of performances and festivals is required.  

** Repeatable in the same school year

Marching Band (Grades 9-12)

Marching Band is a one-semester course designed to advance student technique in the areas of rhythm, tone, ensemble performance, marching technique, musical style, and musical knowledge. Students will use a variety of material provided by the teacher. Students in this class should have previously mastered the basics of the areas listed above. Participation in a variety of performances and festivals is required. 

Jazz Band (Grades 10-12)

Jazz Band is a one-semester course designed to advance student technique in the areas of rhythm, tone, ensemble performance, musical style, and musical knowledge. This will be done through various types of jazz, pop, or rock music. Students will use a variety of material provided by the teacher. Students in this class should have previously mastered the basics of the areas listed above. Participation in a variety of performances and festivals is required, including the Musical and Pep Band.

Prerequisite: audition only

** Repeatable in the same school year

Wind Ensemble (Grades 10-12)

Wind Ensemble is a one-semester course, offered in the second semester only. It is an auditioned concert band designed for the serious band student who has the skills and desire to perform more challenging works of music. Members may participate in marching band or concert band during the first semester. Participation in a variety of performances and festivals is required. 

Prerequisite: audition only

Beginning Guitar (Grades 9-12)

Beginning Guitar is a one-semester course, offered in the first semester only, is designed to introduce and advance student technique in the areas of rhythm, tone, musical style, and musical knowledge on acoustic guitar. This will be done through various types of jazz, pop, or rock music. Students will use a variety of material provided by the teacher. 

Intermediate Guitar (Grades 9-12)

Intermediate Guitar is a one-semester course, offered in the second semester only, is designed to be a continuation of the beginning guitar class which will advance student technique in the areas of rhythm, tone, musical style, and musical knowledge on acoustic guitar. This will be done through various types of jazz, pop, or rock music. Students will use a variety of material provided by the teacher.   

Prerequisite:  Beginning Guitar (or approval from the instructor)

Beginning Piano (Grades 9-12)

Beginning Piano is a one-semester group piano course designed for students who have no prior experience playing the piano. Major focuses include an introduction to the structure of the piano keyboard, posture, hand positions, key signatures, rhythms, intervals, chords, and scales. Students will also learn the basics of writing music notation. Lessons will directly apply music theory and technique to the playing of a selection of classical, folk, jazz, pop, and rock repertoire.

**Open enrollment - No prerequisites

**Priority: seniors > juniors > sophomores > freshmen

Intermediate Piano (Grades 9-12)

Intermediate Piano is a one-semester group piano course designed to be a continuation of beginning piano skills and knowledge. Class content includes instruction of more varied scales, key signatures, chord qualities/inversions, and rhythms. Students will continue to learn how to notate music. A special focus will be placed on a more rigorous and challenging solo repertoire of various genres.

Prerequisite: Interested students should have passed Beginning Piano with a C or better (highly recommended) or demonstrated proficiency in Beginning Piano skills from prior piano lessons.

Concert Choir (Grades 9-12)

Concert Choir is an entry-level high school Tenor/Bass choir. This is a one-semester, repeatable course. (Participation for the full school year is expected, and what most students try to do. Exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis to accommodate scheduling conflicts). Students in this class have the opportunity to explore various aspects of vocal technique within a group setting. Students also learn how to read music notation and work throughout the year to become proficient at music reading skills. Major performances during the year include the Fall Concert, Holiday Pops Concert, District Choral Festival, and Collage Concert. Other performances may be scheduled as the opportunity arises.  A wide variety of choral literature will be rehearsed and performed in this group setting.  

** Repeatable in the same school year

Treble Chorus (Grades 9-10)

Treble Chorus is an entry-level high school Soprano/Alto choir. This is a one-semester, repeatable course. (Participation for the full school year is expected, and what most students try to do. Exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis to accommodate scheduling conflicts). Students in this class have the opportunity to explore various aspects of vocal technique within a group setting. Students also learn how to read music notation and work throughout the year to become proficient at music reading skills. Major performances during the year include the Fall Concert, Holiday Pops Concert, District Choral Festival, and Collage Concert. Other performances may be scheduled as the opportunity arises. A wide variety of choral literature will be rehearsed and performed in this group setting. 

** Repeatable in the same school year

Select Women's Chorus (Grades 10-12)

Select Women’s Ensemble is an intermediate to advanced skill level high school SSA choir. This is a one-semester, repeatable course. (Participation for the full school year is expected, and what most students try to do. Exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis to accommodate scheduling conflicts). Students in this ensemble are expected to have a heightened understanding of breathing technique, vocal physiology, expressive elements of the voice, and demonstrated at least intermediate level proficiency in sight-reading. Members of the Select Women’s Ensemble exhibit positive leadership and communication skills, have a good work ethic, and function well as part of a team. Major performances during the year include the Fall Concert, Holiday Pops Concert, District Choral Festival, and Collage Concert. Other community performances may be scheduled as the opportunity arises.  A wide variety of choral literature will be rehearsed and performed in this group setting. A strong commitment to excellence is necessary. 

Prerequisite: audition required/director approval needed

** Repeatable in the same school year

Chamber Choir (Grades 10-12)

Chamber Choir is an intermediate to advanced skill level high school SATB choir. This is a one-semester, repeatable course. (Participation for the full school year is expected, and what most students try to do. Exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis to accommodate scheduling conflicts). Students in this ensemble are expected to have a heightened understanding of breathing technique, vocal physiology, expressive elements of the voice, and demonstrated at least intermediate level proficiency in sight-reading. Members of the Chamber Choir exhibit positive leadership and communication skills, have a good work ethic, and function well as part of a team. Major performances during the year include the Fall Concert, Holiday Pops Concert, District Choral Festival, and Collage Concert. Other community performances may be scheduled as the opportunity arises. A wide variety of choral literature will be rehearsed and performed in this group setting.  A strong commitment to excellence is necessary. 

Prerequisite: audition required/director approval needed

** Repeatable in the same school year

Music Technology/Stage Design (Grades 9-12)

Music Technology/Stage Design is a one-semester course designed to introduce concepts related to Music Technology for live performance, as well as Stage Design and Construction, Light and Sound Design for Implementation.  Some after school and evening commitments such as the Musical and Collage will be required.  

Prerequisite: none, but Introduction to Woodworking Technology preferred

Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory (Grades 10-12)

AP Music Theory is a two-semester course designed to align with a collegiate Music Theory/Aural Perception course. Students will learn the fundamentals of written notation music theory such as key signatures, time signatures, pitch recognition based on clef, major and minor scales, intervals, chord structure, chord progressions, cadences, and an introduction to voice leading. They will also be introduced to the basics of aural pitch recognition, sight-reading/singing of short examples based on relative pitch, dictation, interval recognition, and the “moveable do” system. Later, students will learn secondary chords, non-chord tones, mode mixture, music analysis, score reading, modulations, form in Western music, and introduce 20th-21st century composition ideas. Students will also continue building upon their aural perception skills through advanced sight-reading/singing, dictation of more complex rhythms, and keys using compound meter. 

Prerequisite: must be enrolled in a Band or Choir class; priority to upperclassmen

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 Physical Education and Health 

Physical Education (Grades 9-12)

This one-semester course is a prerequisite for other PE courses. The students will acquire knowledge about a variety of sports, games, and fitness exercises. Cardio-vascular endurance, flexibility, and strength training are introduced. Students will learn how to develop a personal wellness program. The course will also help students increase their skills in playing various sports, and in finding a physical activity they enjoy doing. 

**One semester of Physical Education is required for graduation

Health (Grades 9-12)

The goal of Health, a one-semester class, is to give students the tools they need to make healthy choices throughout their life. Major areas of study include personal health and wellness, CPR, mental health, substance abuse, laws that affect teens, nutrition, and physical activity. Reproductive health and healthy relationships will also be covered in the class. Parents/guardians will be notified before this section of the class begins and may opt to have their student excused from this section of the class.  

**One semester of Health is required for graduation.

Weight Training (Grades 10-12) 

Weight training is a one-semester course that emphasizes developing the body’s strength and size. Topics include muscle identification, methods of training, weight training safety, and an introduction to different lifts. One of the main goals of the course is to have students create a program for their individual training and development that can be used to develop a lifelong love for weight training.

** Repeatable in the same school year

Competitive Athlete Development (Grades 10-12) 

Competitive Athlete Development is a one-semester course designed for highly motivated students who want to improve their development as a competitive athlete. This high-intensity and rigorous fitness class is designed to provide each student with instruction on how to train like a competitive athlete. “Competitive Athlete Development” is divided into two focus areas. The first area is focused on the physical skills that an athlete needs to be competitive. The physical training includes strength, quickness, athletic explosiveness, and flexibility which all create a physically competitive athlete. In addition to physical skills, the mindset of an athlete is equally important. Grit, resiliency, dedication, and leadership are paramount to having a strong mindset as a competitive athlete. Within these two focus areas, students will be engaged in a training program that is focused specifically to develop individuals as overall competitive athletes, as well as pursuing specific training goals set in a cooperative effort between the teacher and the student. From their participation in “Competitive Athlete Development,” students will gain the knowledge in physical skills and mental mindset to become a competitive athlete. 

** Repeatable in the same school year.

** It is recommended students take this course in their off-season time. For example, if you solely run track, you should take this course in the fall/first semester. If you are solely a football player, you should take this course in the spring/second semester.  

** If you are a multisport athlete, it is advised that you consult your coach before taking this course while you are in-season. The expectation is that you work as hard in class as you would at practice and competition. 

Lifetime Sports (Grades 11-12)

This one-semester class is designed for the student who would like to improve their skills, maintain a health-enhancing level of fitness, and develop stress-reduction techniques through the enjoyment and pleasure they receive from team and individual sports and activities. These sports and activities have carry-over value to adult life. Sports include archery, soccer, Wiffle Ball, badminton, pickleball, volleyball, basketball, flag football, team handball, spikeball, and ultimate frisbee.

**This course cannot be repeated in the same school year.

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 Science

 An effective science curriculum prepares students to become scientifically literate by developing an inquisitive mind, developing and applying problem-solving/investigative techniques, instilling a responsibility toward our environment, developing readiness for the technology of the 21st century, and applying scientific knowledge to everyday experiences. 

Suggested Course Sequence: 

Freshman: Chemistry I and Physics I (in any order)

Sophomore: Biology 

Junior/Senior: Anatomy and Physiology, Physics II, Chemistry II, AP Biology, AP Chemistry

Chemistry I (Grades 9-12)

Chemistry I is a one-semester, required science course that meets the minimum state standards for graduation. It is recommended to take in 9th grade. This class is an overview class of the main topics in chemistry.  This class is an introduction to chemistry that will specifically address the Next Generation Science Standards.  Students that plan on attending tech school, college, or any postsecondary institute should also plan on enrolling in Chemistry II.  

Physics I (Grades 9-12)

Physics I is a one-semester, required science course that meets the minimum state standards for graduation.  It is recommended to take in 9th grade. This class is an overview class of the main topics in Physics.  This class is an introduction to Physics that will specifically address the Next Generation Science Standards.  Students that plan on attending tech school, college, or any postsecondary institute should also plan on enrolling in Physics II.  

Biology (Grades 9-12)

Biology is a two-semester, required science course. It is recommended to take in 10th grade. The student studies cell structure and function, comparative body systems, growth and reproduction, heredity, DNA, classification, evolution, and the energy cycle. The life cycle of an organism associated with a human disease will be included in the course. Students that plan on attending a technical school, college, or any postsecondary institute should also plan on enrolling in Biology.

Anatomy and Physiology (Grades 11-12)

This is a two-semester science course designed to give students an introduction to human anatomy and physiology.   The course covers the same sequence that most universities use to cover the human body from the cellular/molecular level to the systems level.  The course will include a component that regularly looks at various common disease states that afflict humans.   Several speakers will be included in the course explaining the connection between their career path and their high school preparation.    Successfully completing Anatomy/Physiology will help to prepare you for many career pathways...including but not only college.   Possible careers that Anatomy/Physiology can prepare you for include but are not limited to Farming, Parenting, Health Care, Social Work, Safety Occupations, Physical and Occupational Therapies, Animal Science, and many more.  The rigor of the course is medium.

Prerequisite: Biology

Chemistry II (Grades 11-12)

Chemistry II is a one-semester science course that prepares you for chemistry beyond the Next Generation Science Standard requirements.  This course is intended for students going to college, tech school, and/or any other postsecondary educational institute.  Chemistry II dives deeper into content and mathematical concepts and teaches essential science skills such as problem-solving and higher-level thinking.  This course is highly recommended for students who plan to go into a professional field after high school.  

Prerequisite: Chemistry I

Physics II (Grades 11-12)

Physics II is a one-semester science course that prepares you for physics beyond the Next Generation Science Standard requirements.  This course is intended for students going to college, tech school, and/or any other postsecondary educational institute.  Physics II dives deeper into content and mathematical concepts and teaches essential science skills such as problem-solving and higher-level thinking.  This course is highly recommended for students who plan to go into a professional field after high school.

Prerequisite: Physics I

Advanced Placement (AP) Biology (Grades 11-12)

AP Biology, a two-semester course, is the equivalent of an introductory college biology course (with a high school “safety net.”) You will study the core scientific principles, theories, and processes that govern living organisms and biological systems. You’ll do hands-on laboratory work to investigate natural phenomena.  You will work to refine skills that include:

Designing experiments and procedures to test a prediction or theory

Collecting and analyzing data

Interpreting data to draw conclusions

Developing and supporting a scientific claim with evidence

AP Biology is graded on a 5.0 scale and every student will have the opportunity to take the National AP exam in the spring. Your AP score on this exam can influence the number of college credits received depending on the college you choose and your declared major/minor.  Future related majors in College include but are not limited to: Agriculture Engineering, Animal Science, Athletic Training, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Environmental Science, Forensic Science, Forestry, Genetics, Marine Sciences, Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, Nursing (RN), Pharmaceutical Sciences, Premedical, and Wildlife, Fish, and Wildlands Science and Management. 

Prerequisite: Biology

Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry (Grades 11-12)

The purpose of Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry, a two-semester course, is to provide a college-level course in chemistry and to prepare the student to seek credit and/or appropriate placement in college chemistry courses.   Students are engaged in hands-on laboratory work, integrated throughout the course that accounts for more than 25% of the class time. Emphasis is placed on the depth of understanding of a topic rather than the breadth of topics. If the student passes the AP Chemistry exam, they could earn college credit towards chemistry classes at a college or university.

Prerequisites: Chemistry I; Algebra I, Algebra II (or demonstrated proficiency)

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 Social Studies

 Knowledge and understanding of our history, government, geography, traditions, laws, fundamental principles of liberty, ethical values, and world history is essential in developing literate and informed citizens. We have a responsibility to act judiciously in our homes, communities, country, and foreign lands; and to protect America’s greatest asset, liberty, for the present and future generations.

World History (Grades 9-12) 

World History is a two-semester course in which students will analyze world events from a global perspective. Students will explore and experience world events through analysis of cause and effects, continuity and change, and the inevitability of catalysts and outcomes. Students will analyze the contributions of civilizations through the study of religion, government, politics, technology, and war. Students will experience world history from the medieval time period through the present day. This freshman class will incorporate the themes of geography as well as the hands-on projects of History Alive.

US History (Grades 10-12)

US History is a two-semester course from Industrialization to the present. Successful completion of this course is required for graduation. Areas of study will include: Reconstruction, expansion of industry, westward movement, Progressivism, Imperialism, World War I, decade of the 1920s, The Great Depression, W.W. II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, social change, and the 1960s, the Vietnam Era, and contemporary domestic America. 

Advanced Placement (AP) US History (Grades 10-12)

The AP US History course is a two-semester course designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in US history. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials — their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance— and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The US AP History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. This course can be taken during 10th grade as a replacement for regular US History to earn the credit necessary for graduation. For those who take it as 11th and 12th graders, it will count as an elective course. 

Economics (Grades 10-12)

The purpose of this one-semester course is to further the students’ economic knowledge and decision-making skills for participating in a global economy. Students will describe and demonstrate how economic forces affect consumer and producer decisions. The roles of the private and the public sectors are discussed.  The course also includes an introduction to international economics and trade.

**One semester of Economics is required for graduation

Advanced Placement (AP) Economics (Grades 11-12)

This two-semester course has two main focuses, microeconomics and macroeconomics. The focus of microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision-makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.  The purpose of macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. This course can be taken during 11th grade as a replacement for regular Economics to earn the credit necessary for graduation. 

Government (Grades 10-12)

Government is a one-semester class that is required of all students for graduation. It introduces the student to the form and functions of the federal, state, and local governments. It includes an examination of the three branches of our democratic government. The Constitution will be examined with an emphasis on civil rights. The course will focus on developing skills needed in order to function in a participatory democracy.

**One semester of Government is required for graduation

Psychology (Grades 10-12) 

This one-semester class is designed to acquaint the learner with an introductory overview of Psychology from history and its founding fathers to modern psychological theory. Areas included are learning and memory, motivation and emotions, behavior, stress, social psychology, the senses, personality, altered states of consciousness, defense mechanisms and coping skills, as well as, abnormal psychology. A unit on developmental psychology is also included. Research, experiments, individual and group projects, hands-on activities, in-class discussions, in addition to a firm foundation of vocabulary and practical application, round out the syllabus.

Contemporary Global Issues (Grades 10-12) 

This one-semester course will examine the dynamics of global interactions among nations and regions and contemporary issues that affect all humanity. Such dynamics examined will include competing beliefs and goals, methods of engagement, and conflict and cooperation. Contemporary issues have political, economic, social, historic, and geographic components. Approaches to addressing global and regional issues will be examined through studying their historical influences and through examining the multiple perspectives of a given issue.

**This course cannot be repeated in the same school year.

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 Visual Arts

Beginner Level Courses

Art 1 (Grades 9-12)

This one-semester beginner-level course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the foundational skills and methods of 2-D and 3-D art. The students will be introduced to the elements of art and the principles of design. Students will learn to demonstrate effective use of a variety of drawing and painting techniques including, sighting, perspective, proportion, value/ shading, color, color theory, as well as 3-D techniques relating to form. There will also be an introduction to art history, careers, and visits to local museums and galleries are strongly encouraged.

Photo 1 (Grades 9-12)

In this one-semester beginner-level course, students will learn the technical and artistic use of film cameras and the black and white darkroom. This course focuses on Film Photography as an art medium. It will focus on the basic skills of camera operation, film development, photo printing, and photochemistry. The students will become familiar with the history of photography, its historical impact on our society, and its importance as a tool for artistic expression. Visits to local galleries, museums, and photography studios are strongly encouraged. Students will have access to AHS loaner cameras. The student assumes the cost of any damages caused to the loaner camera while using it.

Sculpture (Grades 9-12)

In this one-semester beginner course, students will develop an understanding of the basic principles of 3-Dimensional Design. There will be an introduction to the principles of 3-D Design as well as an emphasis on abstract/non-objective sculpture. Students will be introduced to a variety of media, including but not limited to clay, paper sculpture, foam carving, weaving, glass bead making, found-object sculpture, and paper maché. Students will gain an understanding of the impact of sculpture on art history, research career options, and visits to local museums and galleries are strongly encouraged.

Intermediate Level Courses

Graphic Design (Grades 9-12)

In this one-semester intermediate-level course, students will focus on the process of communicating visually using text and images to present information through the use of Adobe Creative Cloud (Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, Acrobat Pro, etc.). Students will be introduced to projects that could include, creating original logos, designing and crafting effective promotional pieces, publications, posters, and packaging design. There will also be an introduction to art history, careers, and visits to local museums and galleries are strongly encouraged.

Prerequisite: Art 1

Art 2 (Grades 9-12)

In this one-semester intermediate-level course, students will become more familiar with various 2-D and 3-D media in order to expand their artistic knowledge and skill set. Students will explore: watercolor, linocut printmaking, pastel, charcoal, acrylic on canvas, as well as sculpture-making techniques. Students will become familiar with important movements in art history and their impact on culture. Students will be expected to begin developing a personal style/voice and will be introduced to the importance of concept and meaning in their work. There will be further exploration of career options and visits to local museums and galleries is strongly encouraged.

Prerequisite: Art 1

Photo 2 (Grades 9-12)

In this one-semester intermediate level class, students will expand on the techniques learned in Photo 1 and learn advanced camera, darkroom, and manipulation techniques. There will be an introduction to alternative camera, film, and darkroom techniques. The student will continue to explore the impact of photography on history, as well as various career and higher education opportunities. Students will be expected to begin including concept and theme into their photography and to show an increasing ability to use film photography as a mode of artistic expression. Visits to local galleries, museums, and photography studios are strongly encouraged. Students will have access to AHS loaner cameras. The student assumes the cost of any damages caused to the loaner camera while using it.

Prerequisite: Photo 1

Ceramics (Grades 9-12)

In this one-semester intermediate-level course, students will expand their understanding of the elements and principles of 3-D design with a focus on the use of clay as a medium. The students will explore the various clay building techniques, including coil, slab, wheel throwing, and glazing techniques, and will become familiar with the history of ceramics in both utilitarian and abstract forms. Visits to local museums and galleries are strongly encouraged.

Prerequisite: Sculpture

Advanced Level Courses

Art 3 (Grades 10-12)

In this one-semester advanced-level course, students further develop an understanding of the advanced 2-D and 3-D art techniques. They will be introduced to new techniques and media. They will be introduced to the idea of adding conceptual themes to their art and using their art to communicate their personal intentions. There will also be an introduction to creating portfolios and resumes, art history, art careers, and visits to local galleries and museums are strongly encouraged.

Prerequisites: Art 1 + Art 2

Art 4 (Grades 11-12)

In this one-semester advanced level course, the students develop work for their personal portfolio of art. The students are expected to work independently, be self-motivated, develop a personal style, maintain a sketchbook, and research scholarships and college portfolio requirements. The students may choose their media, subject matter, and concept, and are expected to create portfolio-ready work. At the end of the semester, the student will have a minimum of 6 pieces that can be used for their portfolio. The instructor will act as a guide and provide feedback, critique, and assessment. It is recommended, but not required, that students take this class the semester before taking Portfolio Development. This class may be combined with other classes in the event there are not enough students for a full section or taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: Art 1 + Art 2 + at least 1 other intermediate course OR instructor permission

Portfolio Development (Grades 11-12)

In this one-semester advanced level course, the students complete and assemble the work for their personal portfolio of art. The students are expected to work independently, be self-motivated, develop a personal style, maintain a sketchbook, and research scholarships and college portfolio requirements. The students may choose their media, subject matter, and concept and are expected to create portfolio-ready work.

At the end of the semester, the student will have created a minimum of 6 new pieces. The student, with the help of the instructor, will choose their best 10-15 pieces from their HS career and will mount/mat work, assemble it for transport, and create a digital copy of all work. The instructor will act as a guide and provide feedback, critique, and assessment.

This class may be combined with other classes in the event there are not enough students for a full section or taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: Art 1 + Art 2 + at least 1 other intermediate course OR instructor permission.

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 World Language

 The study of a World Language is important because we are citizens of the world, not only of the USA. In an ever-shrinking and dependent world, we must be able to communicate with other people and understand their culture and customs. Knowledge of a world language gives us insight into the English language because many foreign words are included in our language. Knowing a world language is an advantage when looking for a job as world languages are used increasingly in many professions and businesses. When we study a world language, we learn the way people think, live, and express themselves. This helps us to understand and appreciate their culture, to open our minds to foreign cultures, and to understand our own culture and language.

Spanish 1 (Grades 9-12)

This two-semester course introduces the student to the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. The student will develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing the language. The student will study basic vocabulary, word groups, and grammar.  

Spanish 2 (Grades 9-12)

This two-semester course will recall and expand upon the base of knowledge developed in Spanish 1. The student will study more complex vocabulary and grammar and will express thoughts at greater length and detail in written and oral form. Speaking and listening comprehension are improved through individual projects and group conversations. The study of the Hispanic culture is continued in this course.

Prerequisite: Spanish 1  

Spanish 3 (Grades 10-12)

This two-semester course will recall and expand upon the knowledge developed in Spanish 1 and 2. The student will be presented with the more complex structures of basic Spanish and expand the cultural themes of the first and second levels. The course is designed to provide a wide variety of learning experiences and will review all previous tenses as well as introduce the subjunctive mood. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all emphasized in this course with much of the class being conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 2  

Spanish 4 (Grades 11-12)

This two-semester course will recall and expand upon the knowledge developed in Spanish 1, 2, and 3 and will present the student with the more complex structures of Spanish while continuing to expand upon the culture of the Spanish-speaking world.  The course is designed to provide a wide variety of learning experiences and will review all previous tenses as well as a more in-depth study of the subjunctive mood. Students will apply what they have been learning by writing and performing bilingual puppet shows for elementary students.  Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all emphasized in this course with most of the class being conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 3  

Spanish 5 (Grade 12)

This two-semester course will review and expand on all content learned in the previous levels of Spanish and will broaden the use of Spanish outside of the classroom as well as in the classroom.  Students will not just continue to learn the Spanish language, they will use the Spanish language as a vehicle for learning about other topics such as history and art of the Spanish-speaking world.  An emphasis will be put on sharing and supporting opinions during class discussions. We will continue to study grammar usage and expand our vocabulary and students who wish to, will have the opportunity to take the Spanish Language CLEP test and earn college credits.  Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all emphasized in this course with almost all of the class being conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite:  Spanish 4  

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 Programs, Electives, Miscellaneous 

Leadership (Grades 10-12)

Leadership is a one-semester class that is either combined or divided into an all-male section and an all-female section. Students need to leverage their influence in a positive way. Effective leaders must lead themselves before they try to lead others. Leadership covers how to master and manage students' own discipline, emotions, character, identity, and time. The goal is to address and improve the students’ ability to lead themselves and connect with others so that they will eventually lead others within their school community and eventually their world. This class is only a call for young people who want to positively influence their world because society needs young people who desire to build into the lives of our other young people. 

Leadership 2 (Grades 11-12)

Leadership 2 is a one-semester class. Students need to leverage their influence in a positive way. Effective leaders must discover how to lead and influence those around them. It covers character issues like leading teams and organizations, such as focused vision, people skills, strategy, choosing priorities, modeling behavior, team building, initiative and is designed for students in transition, helping them navigate the critical junctions in life.  This class is only a call for young people who want to positively influence their world by building into the lives of our other young people as well as giving them the skills for life after high school. 

**Students do not have to take the 10th grade Leadership class to be eligible for Leadership 2.

Dual Enrollment (Grades 11-12)

This option allows students to take up to 10 college courses at a discounted rate, while they are still in high school. Students are not allowed to take courses currently offered at the high school unless they first complete the high school’s equivalent course. Students cannot dual enroll in physical education, hobby, recreation, or religion courses. 

**Qualifications: To be eligible to take a dual enrollment course, students must have a minimum GPA and a qualifying score on the PSAT, SAT, and/or on the Michigan Merit Exam (MME). 

**Credit: Courses can count for high school credit, college credit, or both – it’s up to the student. Discuss this option with a school counselor. 

**Course Costs: The district will pay for the portion of tuition and fees that is equal to the appropriate percentage of the state foundation allowance for the student. The cost will vary depending on the college the student attends. More expensive colleges will cost the student more out-of-pocket money. 

**Course Location: College campus or online. 

**Transportation: Provided by students.

Early College (Grades 11-12)

Early College provides students with an opportunity to earn a high school diploma as well as an Associate’s Degree. Students can earn up to 60 college credits in the early college program. The early college program requires that students take a course from the high school in a “13th year” after their senior year. The early college program is a partnership among Muskegon Community College, The Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, and other local school districts. 

**Qualifications: Selection is based on an application process. Students must apply in the winter of their 10th grade year.

**Credit: Students take both high school and college courses concurrently. College credits may be transferable. 

**Course Costs: The program is free. Some courses may have a small lab fee, etc. 

**Course Location: College courses will be offered at various locations of Muskegon Community College. 

**Transportation: A bus will be provided to transport AHS students to the remote campus of MCC at the Coopersville Community Center for classes.

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 Careerline Tech Center

Careerline Tech Center provides career education to juniors and seniors in high school and offers the opportunity for students to gain skills and/or prepare for post-secondary education in numerous programs. Tech Center classes are free. Programs are offered Monday through Friday and students attend for a half-day. Interested students and parents can get more information on Careerline Tech Center by visiting the website here.

Each year, Careerline Tech Center has an open house in the fall for parents and potential students to visit the programs and talk with instructors. In January and February, 10th and 11th grade students have the opportunity to visit programs at the Tech Center before selecting a program for the following year. Careerline Tech Center has articulation agreements with 11 area colleges and universities. Those agreements give students the chance to earn college credit while still in high school. Early college credit may be an option for some students. Early college options allow students to enroll, while at the Tech Center, as a college student. College credit is earned and placed on a transcript to follow students to the college of their choice upon high school graduation. While Tech Center credit is earned as electives, most Tech Center programs offer students the opportunity to receive academic credit (4th Year Math, 3rd Year Science, Visual/Performing Arts, and On-Line Learning).   

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 Online Courses

Michigan Virtual High School Online Courses (.5 cr. will be earned for a course taken each semester)

The Virtual High School is an online way for students to take electives and AP courses not offered at AHS. Online courses are a very independent means of learning. A student must be very self-disciplined, motivated, and organized to be successful in these courses. There is an instructor for these courses but communication with them is through email or phone. A student should expect to put at least 7-10 hours of work per week into these courses. Students will be located in a room in the high school to be able to work on the class during their assigned class time. Students will have access to these courses wherever they have internet access, so they should expect to work on them at home. The school will cover the cost of these courses as long as they are successfully completed by the student. A description of these courses can be found at http://www.mivhs.org/Courses. To be eligible to take an online class, the Online Readiness packet must be filled out and turned in to your counselor.

KeyTrain (KT) Online Courses (.5 credit will be earned for each course)

The following two courses utilize the ACT KeyTrain program to teach and promote soft skills within the workplace.

 

  • Employability Skills (Grade 12)

Employability Skills is a course that will cover the topics of time management, self-management, and job performance factors. Students will learn how to improve their skills in these areas and how they should be applied to the workplace.

 

  • Communication Skills (Grade 12)

Communication Skills is a course that will cover the topics of business communications and interpersonal communications. Students will learn how to improve their skills in these areas and how they should be applied to the workplace.

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